THE HERMENEUTICS OF THE PUBLIC SPHERE. ISSUES AND POTENTIALS

ADELA-CORINA FEKETE

admin 27 Jul 2012

The human living space consists of numerous manifestations in either the private or the public sphere. The relationships and the interactions between people are based not only on values and attitudes, and on the adopted norms, but also on the multiple roles they play. These relationships and the interactions are maintained due to some well defined and interpreted behavioural and communication patterns, as the French sociologist Raymond Boudon claimed.

Considered to be a specific obligation to their role, the norms constitute the rules that govern the individual and collective behaviours. Furthermore, Jean-Claude Kaufmanncompletes this picture, that is, the one in the social sphere: the norms of relationships that are continuously negotiated.

Generally, we are tempted to conceptualize the public sphere as being fragmented, comprising a number of spaces and/ or formations that sometimes connect themselves, but other times, on the contrary, they close themselves and/ or find themselves in conflict or debatable relations.

EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY IDEOLOGY AND THE ROOTS OF PUBLIC OPINION IN ENGLAND

CULEA MIHAELA

admin 17 Oct 2011

The paper explores the role of the English periodical press of the eighteenth-century in aspects concerned with moral reformation, social instruction and cultural improvement in general. Analysing the impact of Richard Steele’s and Joseph Addison’s criticism on the society of the eighteenth-century England we can observe that the two inaugurated the emergence of public opinion but they also put forth general human rights, such as the liberty of expression. According to Jürgen Habermas the eighteenth-century English periodicals can account for the genesis of the bourgeois public sphere. But the dawn of public opinion also supported the formation of the eighteenth-century English ideology understood as a system of social beliefs. It seems that the ideological patterns advocated by the journalists or the writers of the eighteenth-century England foregrounded original values for the general public, such as common-sense, morality, wit, taste, or decorum.