METAPHORICAL CONCEPTS BEYOND EVERYDAY LANGUAGE

Posted On Jul 27 2012 by

Along the years, metaphors have been perceived as powerful instruments of effectiveness used by writers to achieve a certain literary effect. However, they are more than rhetorical devices employed by orators and writers to strengthen and decorate their speeches and composition. Recently, cognitive linguists have demonstrated that metaphors play an important role in language and constitute people’s primary mode of mental operation, influencing the way in which they conceptualize abstract concepts such as identity, morality, life, love, etc. Thus, metaphor proves to be the main mechanism through which people comprehend abstract concepts and perform abstract reasoning. Nowadays, we can talk …


TRANSLATING PROVERBS: CULTURAL (UN)TRANSLATABILITY

Posted On Jul 27 2012 by

Translation usually involves some sort of mediation between source and target cultures, given the fact that there is no culturally neutral language. And this can best be seen in the translation of phraseological units, since phraseology is probably the major mechanism contributing to the formation and reinforcement of a cultural identity of a people. The present paper aims to examine the way in which the cultural values that are embedded in proverbs can or (sometimes) cannot be transferred to other languages. The specific challenges of this type of translation will be analysed following the proverbs found in the Romanian version …


PROVERBS: TERMINOLOGY AND POSSIBLE INTERPRETATIONS

Posted On Oct 17 2011 by

The idea is shared that all fixed expressions, proverbs included, are specific to a certain social, psychologic and cultural background which endows them with certain expressive values. Fixed espressions, in general, and proverbs, in particular, are culturally-or sitautionally-bound. The great variety of proverbs existing in any language brings to the fore a very important aspect, namely that proverbs are coded culturally and lexically and they are a phenomenon of discourse, not simply of lexicon.