COMMON EUROPEAN CULTURE IN GEORGE ELIOT’S “MIDDLEMARCH”

Posted On Jul 23 2014 by

This paper aims at identifying the presence of “otherness” as represented by Europein George Eliot’s novel Middlemarch, as well as the function and uses of the space of this “great confederation”[1]. Our analysis focuses upon the co-existence of, and tension between, a common European culture and the distinctive features of Victorian English national life. George Eliot, as well as other Victorian writers (Charles Dickens, the Brontë sisters, Anthony Trollope, Thomas Hardy), seem to relate a varying time span of their characters’ lives to different European countries (Italy, France, Germany) not only to trace the history, growth and development of a …


TEACHING CULTURAL DIVERSITY THROUGH MULTIMEDIA PROJECTS

Posted On Oct 18 2011 by

The purpose of this research paper is to analyse the mass media as being more than an agglomeration of images passively consumed by the students. The latest studies conducted in this domain have illustrated that the viewer is actively involved in decoding these programmes, generating different interpretations. The context of this research has been provided by the Cultural Studies lessons taught at “Petru Rareş”NationalCollegefrom Suceava. The teachers who work with students involved in the bilingual programme frequently use multimedia resources when teaching as well as assessing the students’ projects.  During these activities, I have noticed an increased openness on the …


THE BEYONDNESS OF IDENTITY IN SYLVIA PLATH’S POEMS

Posted On Oct 17 2011 by

This paper investigates the discursive ways in which Sylvia Plath’s artistic identity is constructed in some of her most representative poems. Our analysis focuses on the difficult relationship this poetic “I” establishes with the otherness of language and with the elusive “something else” beyond language that is only felt and never defined sufficiently. Leon Wieseltier’s ideas on identity constitute a theoretical basis for the demonstration that Plath’s “I” becomes a signifier/axe that alienates/splits the subject not only from the words themselves, but also from what is, but cannot be spoken


CONRAD AND (POST)COLONIAL THEORY

Posted On Oct 17 2011 by

Criticizing colonialism and its main structures can be regarded as a kind of marginal activity when compared to mainstream issues of literary theory and cultural discourse because of the limited number of people with a particular interest in the geographical peripheries of metropolitan European culture. Yet, the long-term strategy of postcolonial thinking is to produce a revolutionary restructuring of European understanding of history. Opposing the critique of colonialism to European culture can prove to be unproductive but looking at the extent to which they are already deeply implicated within each other could turn out to be a really rewarding enterprise. …


CONSTANTIN GĂVĂNESCUL AND KUNITAKE KUME: IN SEARCH OF SELF AND OTHER IN A FOREIGN LAND – A COMPARISON BETWEEN THEIR TRAVEL DIARIES

Posted On Oct 17 2011 by

A Japanese Historian – Kunitake Kume (1839 – 1931) and a Romanian officer – General Constantin Găvănescul (18871 – 1942) – travel far away from their homelands as official members of the embassies of their own countries. Kume and his companions from the Iwakura mission cross the Pacific Ocean in December 1871, and then they travel through the United States of America, finally reaching Western Europe. After their visits through twelve countries – the United States, Great Britain, France, Belgium, Holland, Germany, Russia, Denmark, Sweden, Italy, Austria and Switzerland – the Japanese Embassy came back to Japan in September 1873. …