A LEGAL LANGUAGE ISSUE: LAW AS “MASCULINE CULTURE”

Posted On Jul 18 2014 by

This paper is a response to the problem of (neutral) legal language and discusses the assumption that law is a “masculine culture”. We consider that the masculinities of legal language are based on the ground that the “proximate genre” in legal discourse is the male one. From the “reasonable” man’s perspective to the special legislation concerning women’s rights, legal language underlines the idea that the legal field, as a reflection of social life, is andocentric. Thus, we will present how the modern representation of women is affecting the law and unleashing normative strategies challenging “gender equality”.


MALE MARGINALITY IN HENRY JAMES’S INTERNATIONAL NOVELS

Posted On Jul 18 2014 by

In Henry James’s international novels, some of the male characters are offered a marginal place. Their marginality is caused by the lack of aggression and masculinity, by illness, lack of desire and normal heterosexual life, but also of financial success. They are caught in a clash between society, which is based on the conventional image of masculinity (physical aggression, heterosexual activity) and the marginal male ‘self’, characterized by atypical aspects (androgyny, homosexuality, passivity). The result is a strong disappointment as they gradually or suddenly discover their lack of importance in the lives of the people around them. These male characters …


CULTURAL SPACES AND MARGINALITY IN A RAISIN IN THE SUN

Posted On Jul 18 2014 by

Marginalization has been a special matter of question for African-American leaders, thinkers (B.T. Washington, W.E.B. Dubois) and writers in the United States. Thus, it has been an ongoing debate throughout the 20th century and the debate was drawn in A Raisin in the Sun (1959), and the first play that was presented on Broadway by an African-American female dramatist, Lorraine Hansberry. The aim of this study is to analyze marginality related to cultural spaces in A Raisin in the Sun through social criticism. Derrida’s basic formulation, ‘différance’, reflects that meaning can be deferred. This formulation is applied to A Raisin …


MONOLOGUE AS A DISCOURSE OF MARGINALITY IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN DRAMA

Posted On Jul 18 2014 by

Monologue has been used as a form of substitute communication throughout the history of drama. As substitution of stage communication, monologue can be read as the attempt to explain the unexplainable and speak the unspeakable on the stage. The form and shape of monologue, however, has been changed since the 1960’s, and has become voice of marginality. Contemporary American dramatists such as Edward Albee, Maria Irene Fornes and August Wilson, with many others, employ monologue as a discourse of marginality in their prominent plays. They create monologists in order to give voice to marginal, and reflect marginality of identity, certain …