THE GLOBALIZATION OF THE SELF-OTHER DICHOTOMY: IDEOLOGICAL TRENDS

KAMIL AYDIN

admin 23 Jul 2014

It is generally accepted that in every historical period there appears a close connection between the dominant ideological discourse and the current artistic or literary trends or attitudes. Due to the deep impact of social, cultural and political bi-polarization as a direct result of the Cold War Era in the second half of the 20th century, we happened to form our artistic, literary or even critical stance from the viewpoint of binary opposition like self and other, with particular reference to postcolonial discourses initiated by such pioneering figures as Edward Said, Homi Bhabha, Gayatri Spivak, Frantz Fanon, Jacques Derrida and Michel Foucault. Along with the collapse of the Eastern Bloc towards the end of the 20th century, triggered by the political discourse of more freedom and democracy, there appeared new nations, states, borders, ruling systems as well as new economic, philosophical, cultural and artistic attitudes and tendencies nurtured by the magical power of the concept of globalization. In other words, in the gradual transformation process from bipolarization (East-West) to the unified notion of globalization, a term which can simply be defined as moving from diversity to a common paradigm, we have already met cosmopolitan concepts and terms such as multiculturalism, multilingualism, etc.  This new era also brought the discovery or rediscovery of ethnic identities, cultures, beliefs and attitudes. The question underlying this paper is whether globalization really offers a recipe for getting rid of polarization and other problematic issues.

THE CULTURAL AND IDENTITY REPRESENTATIVENESS OF THE JOURNALIST CARAGIALE, NOWADAYS

OANA ANDREEA CONTOMAN

admin 27 Jul 2012

The writings of Caragiale, although published more than 100 years ago, outline social, cultural and political realities applicable even today. Current critical reviews strengthen the idea that the classical writing of Caragiale shows both the strategies of articulating the journalistic texts, largely similar to those used for writing the literary texts, and the correct understanding of the socio-political and economic situation ofRomaniain the nineteenth century. This was completed by the anticipation of future events and states of affairs. This paper aims to examine, from this point of view, the size of Caragiale’s representativeness of journalistic writing for Romanian culture, as well as the classical feature of his writing, which is seen as a guarantee of social and political validity of his views.

EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY IDEOLOGY AND THE ROOTS OF PUBLIC OPINION IN ENGLAND

CULEA MIHAELA

admin 17 Oct 2011

The paper explores the role of the English periodical press of the eighteenth-century in aspects concerned with moral reformation, social instruction and cultural improvement in general. Analysing the impact of Richard Steele’s and Joseph Addison’s criticism on the society of the eighteenth-century England we can observe that the two inaugurated the emergence of public opinion but they also put forth general human rights, such as the liberty of expression. According to Jürgen Habermas the eighteenth-century English periodicals can account for the genesis of the bourgeois public sphere. But the dawn of public opinion also supported the formation of the eighteenth-century English ideology understood as a system of social beliefs. It seems that the ideological patterns advocated by the journalists or the writers of the eighteenth-century England foregrounded original values for the general public, such as common-sense, morality, wit, taste, or decorum.

POWER THROUGH METAPHOR IN BUSINESS MEDIA TEXTS

NICOLAE OANA ADINA

admin 17 Oct 2011
It has already been demonstrated that business media texts are characterized by coherent conceptual models centring on different metaphors. Such models encompass various power-building mechanisms that the respective discourse shares with related social practices. Since these mechanisms are not necessarily conspicuous, the present article focuses on revealing how metaphors indirectly ascribe and delegate power to different categories of business actors (men/women, authors of business commentaries, leaders etc.) by embedding ideology in the written text