REPLICATING THE QUINTESSENTIAL FEATURES OF ENGLISH NATIONAL IDENTITY IN JULIAN BARNES’ ENGLAND, ENGLAND

Posted On Jan 15 2019 by

In his novel England, England, Barnes imagines a grand Project that promises an authentically English experience offered by a small replica of England on the Isle of Wight, a reconstruction skilfully based on a list of Fifty Quintessences of Englishness. Guided by a strong belief that “we are the new pioneers, we must sell our past to other nations as their future” (Barnes, 2012: 40), the engineers of the Project exploit the necessity of replicating history and culture for business purposes. The paper explores some of these aspects, with a central interest in the concept of Englishness, that all-encompassing collection …


ACCIDENTAL CHRONICLES OF THE ANGLO-IRISH MINORITIES IN IRELAND: JENNIFER JOHSTON’S THE CAPTAINS AND THE KINGS AND THE RAILWAY STATION MAN

Posted On Jul 23 2014 by

This study concentrates on the lives of Anglo-Irish Protestant minorities in Ireland, as they are described in Jennifer Johnston’s novels, The Captains and the Kings and The Railway Station Man. Minority problems are one of the most significant issues of today’s global world and Johnston deals with them by emphasizing the marginal position of Anglo-Irish families in Irish society, the gap between social classes, the conflict between Irishness and Englishness and the constant threat of militarism. The Captains and the Kings uses various metaphorical references to render the poignancy of the situations of the Anglo-Irish and English characters. In The …


COMMON EUROPEAN CULTURE IN GEORGE ELIOT’S “MIDDLEMARCH”

Posted On Jul 23 2014 by

This paper aims at identifying the presence of “otherness” as represented by Europein George Eliot’s novel Middlemarch, as well as the function and uses of the space of this “great confederation”[1]. Our analysis focuses upon the co-existence of, and tension between, a common European culture and the distinctive features of Victorian English national life. George Eliot, as well as other Victorian writers (Charles Dickens, the Brontë sisters, Anthony Trollope, Thomas Hardy), seem to relate a varying time span of their characters’ lives to different European countries (Italy, France, Germany) not only to trace the history, growth and development of a …