DREAM, REALITY AND ILLUSION AS DISCURSIVE CONCEPTS IN AMERICAN DRAMA: O’NEILL, WILLIAMS, MILLER, ALBEE

Posted On Dec 11 2017 by

The roots of such concepts as dream, reality, and illusion are as old as human history. The human being has dreamt of his/her existence, supernatural events, natural environment, society, and family since primitive ages. Dream might roughly stem from, or, be described as intuition, longing and in this context it is a vivid and enthusiastic emotion and/or sensation. Reality, however, reflects whatever independent from human subconscious, and expresses concrete and objective things in general. A person, mostly, takes refuge in the dreams when he/she makes a choice between reality and sensation, emotion and intuition in his/her memory. Thus, dream in …


MONOLOGUE AS A DISCOURSE OF MARGINALITY IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN DRAMA

Posted On Jul 18 2014 by

Monologue has been used as a form of substitute communication throughout the history of drama. As substitution of stage communication, monologue can be read as the attempt to explain the unexplainable and speak the unspeakable on the stage. The form and shape of monologue, however, has been changed since the 1960’s, and has become voice of marginality. Contemporary American dramatists such as Edward Albee, Maria Irene Fornes and August Wilson, with many others, employ monologue as a discourse of marginality in their prominent plays. They create monologists in order to give voice to marginal, and reflect marginality of identity, certain …