EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY IDEOLOGY AND THE ROOTS OF PUBLIC OPINION IN ENGLAND


Posted On Oct 17 2011 by

The paper explores the role of the English periodical press of the eighteenth-century in aspects concerned with moral reformation, social instruction and cultural improvement in general. Analysing the impact of Richard Steele’s and Joseph Addison’s criticism on the society of the eighteenth-century England we can observe that the two inaugurated the emergence of public opinion but they also put forth general human rights, such as the liberty of expression. According to Jürgen Habermas the eighteenth-century English periodicals can account for the genesis of the bourgeois public sphere. But the dawn of public opinion also supported the formation of the eighteenth-century English ideology understood as a system of social beliefs. It seems that the ideological patterns advocated by the journalists or the writers of the eighteenth-century England foregrounded original values for the general public, such as common-sense, morality, wit, taste, or decorum.

Last Updated on: October 17th, 2011 at 1:30 P, by admin


Written by admin